Heart - Tradução Inglês do Inglês

Traduza Heart para Inglês

Babylon 10

O software de tradução mais popular

Baixe - é grátis

Idioma Fonte

Idioma Alvo

four-chambered bodily muscular organ which pumps blood (Anatomy); center, core; central and vital part (as "heart of the city"); courage to go on (e.g.: "Tina did not have the heart to sue him"); mettle, spunk;


One of the central sutras in Mahayana Buddhism. It is particularly important in Zen because of its teaching about emptiness . The key idea of this teaching is: "Form is no other than emptiness, emptiness is no other than form." For an on-line translation of the Heart Sutra, click here .

Heart The heart is the seat in the human body of buddhic consciousness, corresponding to the anahata chakra which is ruled by the planet Venus. There are three principal centers of the human body: the heart as the center of spiritual consciousness; the head as the center of mental consciousness; and the navel as the center of kamic or emotional consciousness. The heart is the organ through which the higher ego acts, seeking to impress the lower self which works through the brain. In this sense the heart is the most important part of the body, and when developed leads to spiritual mastery, the unity of atma-buddhi-manas. In another sense, the heart corresponds to prana, "but only because Prana and the Auric Envelope are essentially the same, and because again as Jiva it is the same as the Universal Deity" (BCW 12:694).
Cosmically, the sun is the beating heart of the solar system, and the sunspot cycle of approximately 12 years represents the cycle of its beating, as it sends forth and receives back the circulations on many planes which sustain the solar system. The sun is "a beating heart; in another sense, it is a brain. There is a temptation to use the words heart and brain literally, and such usage wanders not far from fact. But it is not the physical globe which is the true head and heart, except insofar as the physical universe is concerned. The real head and the real heart, coalescing and working as one, are the divinity behind and above and within the physical vehicle of our glorious daystar" {FSO 299; cf SD 1:541-2}.
Sacred Heart In modern times a Roman Catholic cult which uses the heart as a symbol, especially the heart of Jesus, to which they address devotions. From time to time there have been various Christians who have particularly stressed this aspect of their religious views, among them St. Gertrude and St. Francis of Sales (17th century) who gave this symbol to his order as its object. By edict of Pope Pius IX (1856) the day is observed in the general calendar of the Church.
In ancient times the heart was also a sacred symbol, in Egypt associated with Horus, in Babylon, with Bel, while in Greece the lacerated heart was connected with Bacchus. "Its symbol was the persea. The pear-like shape of its fruit, and of its kernel especially, resembles the heart in form. It is sometimes seen on the head of Isis, the mother of Horus, the fruit being cut open and the heart-like kernel exposed to full view" (TG 283).


Form of energy field work developed by George M. DeLalio, R.N., D.C., a proponent of crystal healing. Its postulate is that lifestyle and mental processes often disrupt the "etheric pathways" of "healing energy" produced by the brain.

heart
\heart\ (?), n. [oe. harte, herte, heorte, as. heorte; akin to os. herta, ofies. hirte, d. hart, ohg. herza, g. herz, icel. hjarta, sw. hjerta, goth. ha?rt&?;, lith. szirdis, russ. serdtse, ir. cridhe, l. cor, gr. &?;, &?; &?;&?;&?;&?;. cf. accord, discord, cordial, 4th core, courage.]
1. (anat.) a hollow, muscular organ, which, by contracting rhythmically, keeps up the circulation of the blood. why does my blood thus muster to my heart!
note: in adult mammals and birds, the heart is four-chambered, the right auricle and ventricle being completely separated from the left auricle and ventricle; and the blood flows from the systematic veins to the right auricle, thence to the right ventricle, from which it is forced to the lungs, then returned to the left auricle, thence passes to the left ventricle, from which it is driven into the systematic arteries. see illust. under aorta. in fishes there are but one auricle and one ventricle, the blood being pumped from the ventricle through the gills to the system, and thence returned to the auricle. in most amphibians and reptiles, the separation of the auricles is partial or complete, and in reptiles the ventricles also are separated more or less completely. the so-called lymph hearts, found in many amphibians, reptiles, and birds, are contractile sacs, which pump the lymph into the veins.
2. the seat of the affections or sensibilities, collectively or separately, as love, hate, joy, grief, courage, and the like; rarely, the seat of the understanding or will; -- usually in a good sense, when no epithet is expressed; the better or lovelier part of our nature; the spring of all our actions and purposes; the seat of moral life and character; the moral affections and character itself; the individual disposition and character; as, a good, tender, loving, bad, hard, or selfish heart. hearts are dust, hearts' loves remain.
3. the nearest the middle or center; the part most hidden and within; the inmost or most essential part of any body or system; the source of life and motion in any organization; the chief or vital portion; the center of activity, or of energetic or efficient action; as, the heart of a country, of a tree, etc. exploits done in the heart of france. peace subsisting at the heart of endless agitation.
4. courage; courageous purpose; spirit. eve, recovering heart, replied. the expelled nations take heart, and when they fly from one country invade another. w. temple.
5. vigorous and efficient activity; power of fertile production; condition of the soil, whether good or bad. that the spent earth may gather heart again.
6. that which resembles a heart in shape; especially, a roundish or oval figure or object having an obtuse point at one end, and at the other a corresponding indentation, -- used as a symbol or representative of the heart.
7. one of a series of playing cards, distinguished by the figure or figures of a heart; as, hearts are trumps.
8. vital part; secret meaning; real intention. and then show you the heart of my message.
9. a term of affectionate or kindly and familiar address. "i speak to thee, my heart."
note: heart is used in many compounds, the most of which need no special explanation; as, heart-appalling, heart-breaking, heart-cheering, heart-chilled, heart-expanding, heart-free, heart-hardened, heart-heavy, heart-purifying, heart-searching, heart-sickening, heart-sinking, heart-stirring, heart-touching, heart-wearing, heart-whole, heart-wounding, heart-wringing, etc.


 new heart 
 white-heart 
 heart hardness 
 to set the heart upon 
 lion-heart 
 to learn by heart 
 to take heart 
 heart-whole 
 in good heart 
 out of heart 
 lion`s heart 
 heart shell 
 to get by heart 
 after one`s own heart 
 floating heart 
 heart-wounded 
 to break the heart of 
 to enlarge the heart 
 heart sickness 
 to take heart of grace 
 heart sugar 
 to take to heart 
 take to heart 
 to break the heart 

n. tIq

The heart is a hollow muscular organ that pumps blood throughout the blood vessels to various parts of the body by repeated, rhythmic contractions. It is found in all animals with a circulatory system, which includes the vertebrates.

See more at Wikipedia.org...
  1. REDIRECT
Human error assessment and reduction technique (HEART) is a technique used in the field of human reliability assessment (HRA), for the purposes of evaluating the probability of a human error occurring throughout the completion of a specific task. From such analyses measures can then be taken to reduce the likelihood of errors occurring within a system and therefore lead to an improvement in the overall levels of safety. There exist three primary reasons for conducting an HRA; error identification, error quantification and error reduction. As there exist a number of techniques used for such purposes, they can be split into one of two classifications; first generation techniques and second generation techniques. First generation techniques work on the basis of the simple dichotomy of ‘fits/doesn’t fit’ in the matching of the error situation in context with related error identification and quantification and second generation techniques are more theory based in their assessment and quantification of errors. ‘HRA techniques have been utilised in a range of industries including healthcare, engineering, nuclear, transportation and business sector; each technique has varying uses within different disciplines.

See more at Wikipedia.org...


Meaning
A kindred spirit - someone I can agree with.
Origin
From The Bible. Samuel 13:14. But now thy kingdom shall not continue: the LORD hath sought him a man after his own heart, and the LORD hath commanded him to be captain over his people, because thou hast not kept that which the LORD commanded thee. Meaning
The lack of something increases the desire for it.
Origin
Used in Francis Davidson's Poetical Rhapsody, 1602. Also in Thomas Haynes Bayly's (1797-1839) Isle of Beauty. 'Absence makes the heart grow fonder, Isle of Beauty, Fare thee well!'. Origin
From Shakespeare's Othello. Origin
Probably related to a English/French old Valentines Eve practice of drawing a girls name from a box. The male agreed to protect the girl for a year. He wore her name in that year on his sleeve.

viscus, pectus

Noun
1. the locus of feelings and intuitions; "in your heart you know it is true"; "her story would melt your bosom"
(synonym) bosom
(hypernym) intuition, hunch, suspicion
2. the hollow muscular organ located behind the sternum and between the lungs; its rhythmic contractions pump blood through the body; "he stood still, his heart thumping wildly"
(synonym) pump, ticker
(hypernym) internal organ, viscus
(hyponym) athlete's heart
(part-holonym) circulatory system, cardiovascular system
(part-meronym) coronary artery, arteria coronaria
3. the courage to carry on; "he kept fighting on pure spunk"; "you haven't got the heart for baseball"
(synonym) mettle, nerve, spunk
(hypernym) courage, courageousness, bravery
4. an area that is approximately central within some larger region; "it is in the center of town"; "they ran forward into the heart of the struggle"; "they were in the eye of the storm"
(synonym) center, centre, middle, eye
(hypernym) area, country
(hyponym) center stage, centre stage
5. the choicest or most essential or most vital part of some idea or experience; "the gist of the prosecutor's argument"; "the heart and soul of the Republican Party"; "the nub of the story"
(synonym) kernel, substance, core, center, essence, gist, heart and soul, inwardness, marrow, meat, nub, pith, sum, nitty-gritty
(hypernym) content, cognitive content, mental object
(hyponym) bare bones
6. an inclination or tendency of a certain kind; "he had a change of heart"
(synonym) spirit
(hypernym) disposition, temperament
7. a plane figure with rounded sides curving inward at the top and intersecting at the bottom; conventionally used on playing cards and valentines; "he drew a heart and called it a valentine"
(hypernym) plane figure, two-dimensional figure
8. a firm rather dry variety meat (usually beef or veal); "a five-pound beef heart will serve six"
(hypernym) variety meat, organs
9. a positive feeling of liking; "he had trouble expressing the affection he felt"; "the child won everyone's heart"
(synonym) affection, affectionateness, fondness, tenderness, warmheartedness
(hypernym) feeling
(hyponym) attachment, fond regard
10. a playing card in the major suit of hearts; "he led the queen of hearts"
(hypernym) playing card
(member-holonym) major suit


To dream of your heart paining and suffocating you, there will be trouble in your business. Some mistake of your own will bring loss if not corrected.

Seeing your heart, foretells sickness and failure of energy.

To see the heart of an animal, you will overcome enemies and merit the respect of all.

To eat the heart of a chicken, denotes strange desires will cause you to carry out very difficult projects for your advancement.
  

Your vision will become clear only when you can look into your own heart. Who looks outside, dreams; who looks inside, awakes.
   In your heart, keep one still, secret spot where dreams may go and sheltered so may thrive and grow.
  

earth hater

croí, croidhe

Heart, (n.)

An automatic, muscular blood-pump. Figuratively, this useful organ is said to be the seat of emotions and sentiments -- a very pretty fancy which, however, is nothing but a survival of a once universal belief. It is now known that the sentiments and emotions reside in the stomach, being evolved from food by chemical action of the gastric fluid. The exact process by which a beefsteak becomes a feeling -- tender or not, according to the age of the animal from which it was cut; the successive stages of elaboration through which a caviar sandwich is transmuted to a quaint fancy and reappears as a pungent epigram; the marvelous functional methods of converting a hard-boiled egg into religious contrition, or a cream-puff into a sigh of sensibility -- these things have been patiently ascertained by M. Pasteur, and by him expounded with convincing lucidity. (See, also, my monograph, "The Essential Identity of the Spiritual Affections and Certain Intestinal Gases Freed in Digestion" -- 4to, 687 pp.) In a scientific work entitled, I believe, "Delectatio Demonorum" (John Camden Hotton, London, 1873) this view of the sentiments receives a striking illustration; and for further light consult Professor Dam's famous treatise on "Love as a Product of Alimentary Maceration".
  

Asgre = n. the heart; the bosom Calon = n. a heart; a centre Crai = n. heat; potency; the heart; the eye of a needle; a. vivid, fervid; Craidd = n. a centre; the heart Derlin = n. the heart of oak Rhuddin = n. heart of timber

See: Cut

Fear of angina, choking or narrowness Fear of the heart

The heart is a muscle which pumps blood it receives from veins into arteries throughout the body. The heart is composed of specialized muscle called "cardiac muscle." (see muscle). The heart, veins and arteries make up the circulatory system.

(v. t.)
To give heart to; to hearten; to encourage; to inspirit.
   (v. i.)
To form a compact center or heart; as, a hearting cabbage.
   (n.)
Vital part; secret meaning; real intention.
   (n.)
Vigorous and efficient activity; power of fertile production; condition of the soil, whether good or bad.
   (n.)
The seat of the affections or sensibilities, collectively or separately, as love, hate, joy, grief, courage, and the like; rarely, the seat of the understanding or will; -- usually in a good sense, when no epithet is expressed; the better or lovelier part of our nature; the spring of all our actions and purposes; the seat of moral life and character; the moral affections and character itself; the individual disposition and character; as, a good, tender, loving, bad, hard, or selfish heart.
   (n.)
The nearest the middle or center; the part most hidden and within; the inmost or most essential part of any body or system; the source of life and motion in any organization; the chief or vital portion; the center of activity, or of energetic or efficient action; as, the heart of a country, of a tree, etc.
   (n.)
That which resembles a heart in shape; especially, a roundish or oval figure or object having an obtuse point at one end, and at the other a corresponding indentation, -- used as a symbol or representative of the heart.
   (n.)
One of a series of playing cards, distinguished by the figure or figures of a heart; as, hearts are trumps.
   (n.)
Courage; courageous purpose; spirit.
   (n.)
A term of affectionate or kindly and familiar address.
   (n.)
A hollow, muscular organ, which, by contracting rhythmically, keeps up the circulation of the blood.
  

khaf-spol

the heart of any man


www.interactiveselfstudy.com

arid central regions of Australia 1. alcoholic drink usually early in the morning, first alcoholic drink of the day, somtimes first cigarette; 2. any drink, as strong coffee, etc., taken before one begins the day's activities


According to the Bible, the heart is the centre not only of spiritual activity, but of all the operations of human life. "Heart" and "soul" are often used interchangeably (Deut. 6:5; 26:16; comp. Matt. 22:37; Mark 12:30, 33), but this is not generally the case. The heart is the "home of the personal life," and hence a man is designated, according to his heart, wise (1 Kings 3:12, etc.), pure (Ps. 24:4; Matt. 5:8, etc.), upright and righteous (Gen. 20:5, 6; Ps. 11:2; 78:72), pious and good (Luke 8:15), etc. In these and such passages the word "soul" could not be substituted for "heart." The heart is also the seat of the conscience (Rom. 2:15). It is naturally wicked (Gen. 8:21), and hence it contaminates the whole life and character (Matt. 12:34; 15:18; comp. Eccl. 8:11; Ps. 73:7). Hence the heart must be changed, regenerated (Ezek. 36:26; 11:19; Ps. 51:10-14), before a man can willingly obey God. The process of salvation begins in the heart by the believing reception of the testimony of God, while the rejection of that testimony hardens the heart (Ps. 95:8; Prov. 28:14; 2 Chr. 36:13). "Hardness of heart evidences itself by light views of sin; partial acknowledgment and confession of it; pride and conceit; ingratitude; unconcern about the word and ordinances of God; inattention to divine providences; stifling convictions of conscience; shunning reproof; presumption, and general ignorance of divine things."


Translate the Inglês term Heart to other languages